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The Palace of Westminster, view from Parliamen Square

The Palace of Westminster, view from Parliamen Square

23.10.2016
Statue of Oliver Cromwell outside the Palace of Westminster

Statue of Oliver Cromwell outside the Palace of Westminster

23.10.2016
The Palace of Westminster

The Palace of Westminster

23.10.2016
The Palace of Westminster

The Palace of Westminster

23.10.2016
Victoria Tower at The Palace of Westminster

Victoria Tower at The Palace of Westminster

30.5.2010
The Palace of Westminster

The Palace of Westminster

May 2010
The Palace of Westminster

The Palace of Westminster

May 2010
The Palace of Westminster

The Palace of Westminster

May 2010
The Palace of Westminster

The Palace of Westminster

May 2011
The Clock Tower, known as Big Ben

The Clock Tower, known as Big Ben

May 2010
The Palace of Westminster

The Palace of Westminster

May 2010
The Palace of Westminster

The Palace of Westminster

2005

The Palace of Westminster

Address:
20 Dean's Yard, London SW1A 0AA
Type:
Public
Completion:
1860
Viewed:
7233

Description of The Palace of Westminster

The Palace of Westminster in Westminster London SW1.

The Palace of Westminster owes its stunning Gothic architecture to the 19th-century architect Sir Charles Barry.

Grade I listed, and part of a UNESCO World Heritage Site, the Palace contains a fascinating mixture of both ancient and modern buildings, and houses an iconic collection of furnishings, archives and works of art.

HISTORY

2010 - Feilden+Mawson was appointed as Architects and Lead Consultants for all buildings on the Parliamentary Estate.

Built on the site of Edward the Confessor's ancient palace, the main residence of the Kings of England until 1511.

The present-day Palace of Westminster is built in the perpendicular Gothic style, which was popular during the 15th century and was responsible for the Gothic revival of the 19th century.

In 1836, the commissioners organised a public competition to design a new Palace in either of these styles. They received 97 entries, each identifiable only by a pseudonym or symbol. From these, the commissioners chose four, of which they were unanimous in preferring entry number 64 which bore the emblem of the Portcullis. This was the entry submitted by Charles Barry, who had proposed a Gothic-styled palace in harmony with the surviving buildings.

The construction of the new Palace began in 1840. While Barry estimated a construction time of six years, at an estimated cost of £724,986, the project in fact took more than 30 years, at a cost of over £2 million. The first stone of the building was laid by Barry's wife on 27 August 1840. The site was extended into the river by reclaiming land, to a total of about eight acres.[1]

The House of Lords first sat in their new purpose-built chamber in 1847 and the House of Commons in 1852 (at which point Charles Barry received a knighthood). Although much of the rest of the building was completed by 1860, construction was not finished until a decade afterwards.

BIG BEN

Named after Sir Benjamin Hall, First Commissioner of the Works when it was hung in 1858. The clock was designed by EJ Deut and the bell by George Mears of the Whitechapel Bell Foundry.[2]

References:
1. The Parliament parliament.uk
2. London Architecture Features and Façades by Matthew Weinreb 1993

Connected Companies

Architect:

News: (4)

Foster + Partners has been short-listed for the refurbishment of the Palace of Westminster:

"The building is an exceptional work of living heritage, a symbol for the United Kingdom and a continuing symbol of democracy throughout the world. The opportunity of turning the magnificent 19th century architecture into a functioning 21st century parliament building within a UNESCO heritage site is one of the most exciting challenges in Britain today. We look forward to the next stage of the process."

11/12/2015 09:15 by Buildington

An Independent Options Appraisal (IOA) for the Restoration and Renewal of the Palace of Westminster has been published by a team of independent, external experts led by Deloitte Real Estate and including AECOM and HOK.

The IOA sets out a range of scenarios, with costs, timescales, risks and benefits. The report does not contain recommendations on which scenario to choose but is intended to enable Parliament to make an informed decision on a preferred way forward. A comprehensive restoration programme is unlikely to start before 2020/21.

Read more about the report here: http://www.restorationandrenewal.parliament.uk/ioa-report.html

19/06/2015 17:04 by Buildington

Unesco inspectors will be visiting London this week to look over developments around the Tower of London and the Palace of Westminster. They are concerned that their status as prized buildings of world importance is being damaged by the building of skyscrapers.

Read More: http://www.liverpooldailypost.co.uk/liverpool-news/regional-news/2011/12/05/london-landmarks-palace-of-westminster-and-tower-of-london-now-under-unesco-world-heritage-spotlight-after-liverpool-visit-92534-29893809/#ixzz1feZD4saz

05/12/2011 11:57 by Buildington

Surveyors have found that the clock tower of Palace of Westminster has developed a tilt.

The top of the tower is now almost 1,5 feet off the perpendicular and experts say the tilt is visible to the naked eye.

If the movement will continue uncorrected, the tower will one day topple. However, at its current speed it would take some 4,000 years to reach the angle of the Leaning Tower of Pisa, and even longer to hit tipping-point.

Source: Telegraph http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/howaboutthat/8815238/Bo ng-Big-Ben-becoming-leaning-tower-of-London-say-engineers.html

10/10/2011 17:15 by Buildington

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