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Statue of Robert Raikes, English philanthropist and Anglican layman, in Victoria Embankment Gardens in front of Savoy hotel

Statue of Robert Raikes, English philanthropist and Anglican layman, in Victoria Embankment Gardens in front of Savoy hotel

15.07.2012
Entrance to Savoy from the riverside

Entrance to Savoy from the riverside

15.07.2012
The riverside elevation of Savoy

The riverside elevation of Savoy

15.07.2012
River View at dusk

River View at dusk

Photo: Fairmont
Bathroom

Bathroom

Photo: Fairmont
Savoy Deluxe Guestroom (Art Deco).

Savoy Deluxe Guestroom (Art Deco).

Photo: Fairmont
River View Deluxe 1 Bedroom Suite (Edwardian). Large, one-bedroom suites offering unrivalled, panoramic views of the River Thames from both the sitting room and bedroom.  Decorated in elegant Edwardian style, the suites offer a separate sitting room, large bedroom with en-suite bathroom, entrance foyer and guest cloakroom.

River View Deluxe 1 Bedroom Suite (Edwardian). Large, one-bedroom suites offering unrivalled, panoramic views of the River Thames from both the sitting room and bedroom. Decorated in elegant Edwardian style, the suites offer a separate sitting room, large bedroom with en-suite bathroom, entrance foyer and guest cloakroom.

Photo: Fairmont
Royal Suite Sitting Room. Refurbished at a cost of over £2.5 million, The Savoy’s Royal Suite is one of the capital’s finest and most well-appointed accommodations. Spread over the front of the entire 5th floor, the suite’s enfilade arrangement makes the most of the dramatic views over the River Thames. From each of the 8 windows, guests can enjoy a magnificent London vista from Canary Wharf to the Houses of Parliament and beyond with 7 of London’s bridges visible.

Royal Suite Sitting Room. Refurbished at a cost of over £2.5 million, The Savoy’s Royal Suite is one of the capital’s finest and most well-appointed accommodations. Spread over the front of the entire 5th floor, the suite’s enfilade arrangement makes the most of the dramatic views over the River Thames. From each of the 8 windows, guests can enjoy a magnificent London vista from Canary Wharf to the Houses of Parliament and beyond with 7 of London’s bridges visible.

Photo: Fairmont
Beaufort Bar. In a theatrical, Art Deco interior of jet-black and burnished gold décor, the bar is all about champagne, cocktails and cabaret.  The bar stands on the hotel’s former cabaret stage that was graced by luminaries such as Carol Gibbons, the Savoy Orpheans and George Gershwin.

Beaufort Bar. In a theatrical, Art Deco interior of jet-black and burnished gold décor, the bar is all about champagne, cocktails and cabaret. The bar stands on the hotel’s former cabaret stage that was graced by luminaries such as Carol Gibbons, the Savoy Orpheans and George Gershwin.

Photo: Fairmont
Gondoliers meeting room. The Venetian look and feel of the Gondoliers' luxurious surroundings and appointments afford an air of particular grandness and opulence to cocktail parties and special dining occasions. The room was created in the 1940s, with the present décor inspired by photographs taken around 1910 of the original Pinafore room.

Gondoliers meeting room. The Venetian look and feel of the Gondoliers' luxurious surroundings and appointments afford an air of particular grandness and opulence to cocktail parties and special dining occasions. The room was created in the 1940s, with the present décor inspired by photographs taken around 1910 of the original Pinafore room.

Photo: Fairmont
River Entrance

River Entrance

Photo: Fairmont
Edwardian corridor

Edwardian corridor

Photo: Fairmont
Abraham Lincoln meeting room. The Edwardian-style Abraham Lincoln Room takes its name from a bust of the President that was unveiled here at a birthday dinner party in 1923. The room has all the latest presentation and video conferencing facilities and is a fine space for business luncheons, formal dinners and dinner dances.

Abraham Lincoln meeting room. The Edwardian-style Abraham Lincoln Room takes its name from a bust of the President that was unveiled here at a birthday dinner party in 1923. The room has all the latest presentation and video conferencing facilities and is a fine space for business luncheons, formal dinners and dinner dances.

Photo: Fairmont
Pinafore meeting room. This is one of the Savoy's original private dining rooms. The décor featuring wooden panelling was designed by Basil Ionides, dating from 1926. Views towards the Thames provide a distinguished setting. Pinafore is well known as the place where The Other Club' meets every other week while Parliament is in session.

Pinafore meeting room. This is one of the Savoy's original private dining rooms. The décor featuring wooden panelling was designed by Basil Ionides, dating from 1926. Views towards the Thames provide a distinguished setting. Pinafore is well known as the place where The Other Club' meets every other week while Parliament is in session.

Photo: Fairmont
Princess Ida & Patience meeting room. Overlooking the Thames, this room has a double name because it was originally two separate private dining rooms when the hotel opened in 1889. The wall between the rooms was removed in 1935.

Princess Ida & Patience meeting room. Overlooking the Thames, this room has a double name because it was originally two separate private dining rooms when the hotel opened in 1889. The wall between the rooms was removed in 1935.

Photo: Fairmont
Mikado meeting room. Created in 1928, Mikado retains its original décor which is appropriately themed with Japanese prints and black-edged wooden panelled walls, a reference to the Gilbert and Sullivan opera from which it takes its name.

Mikado meeting room. Created in 1928, Mikado retains its original décor which is appropriately themed with Japanese prints and black-edged wooden panelled walls, a reference to the Gilbert and Sullivan opera from which it takes its name.

Photo: Fairmont
Lancaster Ballroom is the largest of The Savoy's banqueting rooms. It has a completely clear floor space with no obscuring pillars, perfect for dancing. Uniquely for London it also has its own stage.

Lancaster Ballroom is the largest of The Savoy's banqueting rooms. It has a completely clear floor space with no obscuring pillars, perfect for dancing. Uniquely for London it also has its own stage.

Photo: Fairmont
American Bar in December 1931

American Bar in December 1931

Photo: Fairmont
American Bar. With its electric blue and gold chairs, and constant buzz, the American Bar retains the style of the golden age of cocktails in the 1920’s.

American Bar. With its electric blue and gold chairs, and constant buzz, the American Bar retains the style of the golden age of cocktails in the 1920’s.

Photo: Fairmont
River Restaurant. The revived, overseen by Chef Ryan Murphy, offers an exciting and inspiring dining experience in a contemporary, Art Deco influenced setting with a fine view of the River Thames.

River Restaurant. The revived, overseen by Chef Ryan Murphy, offers an exciting and inspiring dining experience in a contemporary, Art Deco influenced setting with a fine view of the River Thames.

Photo: Fairmont
Bar/Lounge - Thames Foyer. The Thames Foyer is the heart of the hotel and the perfect venue for light, informal dining. Its reinstated glass cupola, based on a guest’s drawing allows natural daylight to flood in on even the darkest day.  The centerpiece of the room is the magnificent new winter garden gazebo.

Bar/Lounge - Thames Foyer. The Thames Foyer is the heart of the hotel and the perfect venue for light, informal dining. Its reinstated glass cupola, based on a guest’s drawing allows natural daylight to flood in on even the darkest day. The centerpiece of the room is the magnificent new winter garden gazebo.

Photo: Fairmont
Lobby - Upper Thames Foyer

Lobby - Upper Thames Foyer

Photo: Fairmont
Lobby - Reading Room.

Lobby - Reading Room.

Photo: Fairmont
Lobby - Front Hall.

Lobby - Front Hall.

Photo: Fairmont
Grand Entrance (click on the photo to view full size).

Grand Entrance (click on the photo to view full size).

Photo: Fairmont

Savoy

Address:
Strand, London WC2R 0EU
Type:
Commercial
Completion:
1889
Venues:
13
Viewed:
44711

Description of Savoy

A British icon since 1889, The Savoy has once again taken its place on the world stage after a £220 million restoration. The hotel seamlessly blends elements of the original and the new while the stunning English Edwardian and Art Deco interiors sparkle with timeless elegance and glamour.

History

Back in 1246, a stretch of land between the Strand and the Thames was presented by Henry III to Peter, Count of Savoy, uncle and consort to the King’s wife. Peter built his Savoy Palace on the river, and the name has been associated with the place ever since.

Over 600 years later, impresario Richard D’Oyly Carte chose the location for a new theatre to stage the famous operettas written by his friends Gilbert and Sullivan. He decided to call his new building the Savoy Theatre, and the productions were known henceforth as the Savoy Operas. Gilbert and Sullivan were huge on both sides of the Atlantic, and D’Oyly Carte spent a lot of time producing their shows in America. This meant he could stay in some of the newest and best hotels, which impressed him so much with their amazing new technologies that he decided to build his own hotel back in London. The new Savoy on the river took five years to build and opened on August 6, 1889. It caused a sensation.

This, the first true luxury hotel in London, was also the first to be lit by electricity. It had the first electric lifts, known as ‘ascending rooms’. Guest rooms were connected by speaking tube to the valet, maid and floor waiter - and to other parts of the hotel. The Savoy later became the first hotel to provide most of its rooms with private bathrooms en suite. The ‘Savoy bathroom’ became famous for its cascading shower and quick filling bath.

D’Oyly Carte tempted the well-known hotel manager César Ritz to join his new wonder hotel. Ritz was delighted by the perfectly-appointed facilities and great potential at The Savoy. He brought in Auguste Escoffier, leading ‘celebrity chef ’ of his day, to run the kitchens. In the early years, Savoy guests included Sarah Bernhardt and Dame Nellie Melba, for whom Escoffier famously created Melba Toast when she was on a diet and Pêches Melba when she was not.

Artists Whistler and Monet both used views from Savoy windows in their work. Oscar Wilde stayed with his friend Lord Alfred Douglas. The Prince of Wales himself and his coterie were frequent visitors. By 1904 the hotel was such a hit that the blocks on the Strand were added, designed by Thomas Collcutt, and the American Bar and Savoy Grill moved into this new part of the hotel. After the sobering interlude of the Great War, The Savoy gradually began to find itself again, always looking for the latest styles and fashions that would draw the feted and famous. The likes of Noel Coward, George Gershwin, George Bernard Shaw and H G Wells frequented the restaurants and American Bar.

Art deco, jazz and The Savoy were made for each other. The new style was introduced, and the iconic stainless-steel sign over Savoy Court erected in 1929. Top jazz musicians from America came to play and a hydraulic system, installed to raise the dance-floor and turn it into a stage for cabaret acts. Epitomising all the fun and flamboyance of the art deco jazz age, the famous Savoy Cocktail Book was published in 1930.

The stars loved The Savoy. England’s own Vivien Leigh was first introduced to her future husband Laurence Olivier in the hotel’s Front Hall. From America came Hollywood greats such as Al Jolson, Errol Flynn and Katharine Hepburn and from France, Josephine Baker and Coco Chanel. Winston Churchill frequently lunched with his cabinet at the hotel during World War II, and attended his Savoy dining club, The Other Club, until his death in 1965.

Once peace was declared, The Savoy quickly regained its air of glamour and luxury. Princess Elizabeth was first seen with Lt. Philip Mountbatten in public at a Savoy reception. When the Princess became the Queen a few years later, The Savoy threw quite the largest and most lavish Coronation Ball in London.

The new Elizabethan age saw a new generation of actors, film stars and politicians at The Savoy. Among the most glamorous: Elizabeth Taylor, Sophia Loren and Marilyn Monroe. The Savoy swung into the 1960s with guests ranging from Louis Armstrong, Marlon Brando and Jane Fonda to The Beatles and Bob Dylan.

A number of refurbishments were undertaken as the century came to a close, the last completed just in time for the great Savoy party that celebrated the new Millennium. In December 2007 began the most extensive of restorations that would re-launch The Savoy in 2010 with all the flair and opulence of old. What has been achieved is a quite remarkable synthesis of past and present. The Edwardian style of the original buildings and the art deco of the 1920s and 30s have been enhanced to embrace the very latest technology.

The restoration offers guests even higher standards of service and pinnacles of experience, with new names such as the Beaufort Bar and Savoy Tea added to the hotel’s illustrious eating and meeting spots. So The Savoy brings to the 21st century its own style of quality, charm and originality, steeped in the character of London of which it is an essential part. Authentically celebrating its past, The Savoy is now also leading the present.

Source: fairmont.com/savoy

Connected Companies

News: (3)

AccorHotels has signed an agreement with the Qatar Investment Authority (QIA), Kingdom Holding Company (KHC) of Saudi Arabia and Oxford Properties, an Ontario Municipal Employees Retirement System (OMERS) company for the acquisition of FRHI Holdings Ltd (FRHI), parent of Fairmont, Raffles, and Swissôtel.

“This is an outstanding opportunity to add three prestigious brands – Fairmont, Raffles and Swissôtel – to our portfolio, and a great step forward for AccorHotels. It offers us robust and global leadership in luxury hotels, a key segment in terms of geographic reach, growth potential and profitability, for long-term value creation. In addition, the deal allows us to strengthen our human capital with FRHI’s widely respected and talented global workforce which has a proven track record in operating and marketing luxury hotels. The transaction will also enable the Group to consolidate its shareholder base, with the arrival of two high-profile investors that both have extensive expertise in the hospitality industry. This major acquisition demonstrates the Group’s agility in a fast-changing industry and will allow us to more effectively support our guests, clients and hotel owners. Through it, we are positioning ourselves as a key player in the current industry consolidation process while maintaining substantial leeway to implement our transformation plan,” said Sébastien Bazin, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of AccorHotels.

His Excellency Sheikh Abdulla Bin Mohammed Bin Saud Al-Thani, CEO of Qatar Investment Authority, said: “Since making our investment, Fairmont Raffles Hotels International has become a leading luxury hotel company with an expanded international presence. This deal generates the scale needed to drive the next phase of growth in our real estate and hospitality investments. QIA has confidence in AccorHotels and looks forward to becoming a significant shareholder.”

FRHI includes three of the most prestigious global luxury hotel brands: Raffles, Fairmont and Swissôtel. It has 155 hotels and resorts (of which 40 are under
development), and more than 56,000 rooms (of which approximately 13,000 are under development). Its portfolio includes such legendary properties as Raffles Singapore, The Savoy in London, Shanghai’s Fairmont Peace Hotel, The Plaza Hotel in New York, Le Royal Monceau - Raffles Paris, Fairmont San Francisco, Fairmont Banff Springs (Canada), Fairmont Le Château Frontenac in Quebec, the Fairmont Grand Del Mar in San Diego, and Swissôtel The Stamford in Singapore. FRHI has more than 45,000 employees under its brands.

FRHI’s hotels and resorts span 34 countries across five continents, with 42 properties in North America, 2 in South America, 26 in Europe, 17 in Africa/Middle East and 28 in Asia-Pacific.

With nearly 500 luxury and upscale properties, AccorHotels will become one of the key global players in this segment and will be able to offer the most profitable management contracts and the best growth potential in many markets. FRHI teams will bolster AccorHotels’ expertise in the luxury segment and provide the Group with new ambitions, through targeted, value-creative expansion.

AccorHotels aims to generate around €65 million in revenue and cost synergies thanks to the combination of brands, the maximization of hotel earnings, the increased efficiency of marketing, sales and distribution channel initiatives, and the optimization of support costs. Significant improvements will also be made in terms of customer data, thanks to the integration of a customer base including 3 million loyalty members, of which 75% are North Americans. The transaction will be accretive on earnings per share from the second year, with synergies fully effective by the third year. The agreement with Qatar Investment Authority and Kingdom Holding Company of Saudi Arabia provides for the cash payment of $840 million (€768 million at the current exchange rate) and the issuance of 46.7 million Accor shares. These shares will be issued via a reserved capital increase, subject to the approval of shareholders at an Extraordinary Shareholders’ Meeting. The transaction will leave QIA and KHC respective stakes of 10.5% and 5.8% in Accor’s share capital. Two representatives of QIA and one representative of KHC will be appointed to the Accor Board of Directors.

This transaction is subject to the regulatory approvals of the antitrust authorities. Rothschild and Zaoui & Co are acting as financial advisors and Darrois Villey Maillot Brochier and Proskauer Rose LLP are acting as legal advisors to AccorHotels on this transaction. Deutsche Bank Securities Inc. and Morgan Stanley & Co. LLC are acting as financial advisors and McCarthy Tetrault LLP and White & Case LLP are acting as legal advisors to FRHI on this transaction.

17/12/2015 16:11 by Buildington

Anna Wintour celebrated her 21st birthday in this hotel on November 3, 1970 (Front Row by Jerry Oppenheimer).

04/12/2011 15:24 by

The Savoy hotel faced £31m of operating losses in 2010 (£5.5m in 2009) as renovation work at the landmark London hotel ran 18 months over schedule, reports The Telegraph.

Saudi billionaire Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal and his co-investor HBOS have spent more on reviving the hotel than the £230m they paid for the original building.

The accounts filed at companies house also show that the hotel was loss-making during its first 13 weeks of opening. The hotel's general manager, Keiran MacDonald, says it expects to deliver "healthy returns" this year as room occupancy is around 90pc for the past three months.

Source: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/newsbysector/constructionandproperty/8657136/Savoy-losses-hit-31m-after-revamp.html

29/07/2011 11:48 by Buildington

*DISCLAIMER! Information on this page is for guidance only and remains subject to change. Buildington does not sell or let this property. For more information about this property please register your interest on the original website or get in touch with the Connected Companies.

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