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View to Natural History Museum from Cromwell Road in 2014

View to Natural History Museum from Cromwell Road in 2014

1.7.2014
Ice rink next to the NHM

Ice rink next to the NHM

November 2011

November 2011
View to the main entrance

View to the main entrance

November 2011

November 2011
Cocoon - The magnificent cocoon structure will protect and house the Museum's most valuable specimen collections. Designed by internationally renowned C F Møller Architects of Denmark, construction began in June 2006 and finished in September 2008.

Cocoon - The magnificent cocoon structure will protect and house the Museum's most valuable specimen collections. Designed by internationally renowned C F Møller Architects of Denmark, construction began in June 2006 and finished in September 2008.

January 2011

The rounded arches and grand entrance were inspired by basalt columns at Fingal's Cave in western Scotland. This is one of Britain’s most striking examples of Romanesque architecture.

The rounded arches and grand entrance were inspired by basalt columns at Fingal's Cave in western Scotland. This is one of Britain’s most striking examples of Romanesque architecture.

The world-famous Waterhouse Building is a London landmark and a work of art. This beautiful building was designed by Alfred Waterhouse, a young architect from Liverpool. He won the contract after the original architect died.

The world-famous Waterhouse Building is a London landmark and a work of art. This beautiful building was designed by Alfred Waterhouse, a young architect from Liverpool. He won the contract after the original architect died.

May 2009

Waterhouse Building - Natural History Museum

Address:
Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD
Type:
Public
Completion:
1881
Viewed:
7846

Description of Waterhouse Building - Natural History Museum

The Natural History Museum building in South Kensington, London SW7.

The Natural History Museum first opened its doors to the public on Easter Monday in 1881, but its origins go back more than 250 years.

It all started when physician and collector of natural curiosities, Sir Hans Sloane, left his extensive collection to the nation in 1753.

The site in South Kensington was previously occupied by the 1862 International Exhibition building, once described as ‘the ugliest building in London’. Ironically, it was the architect of that building, Captain Francis Fowke, who won the design competition for the new Natural History Museum.

However, in 1865 Fowke died suddenly and the contract was awarded instead to a rising young architect from Liverpool, Alfred Waterhouse.

Waterhouse altered Fowke’s design from Renaissance to German Romanesque, creating the beautiful Waterhouse Building we know today. By 1883 the mineralology and natural history collections were in their new home. But the collections were not finally declared a museum in their own right until 1963.

Darwin Centre

Designed by internationally renowned C F Møller Architects of Denmark, the new building's construction began in June 2006. It is unveiled to the public on 15 September 2009.

The new Darwin Centre building features a 65-metre-long, 8-storey-high cocoon, both symbolically and actually providing protection to the collections housed within.' - Neil Greenwood, Programme Director, Darwin Centre

The state-of-the-art new Darwin Centre cost £78 million and took around 25 months and 280 people to build. Walk through the building's spectacular atrium and marvel at the gigantic cocoon inside its glass box.

Cocoon

The magnificent cocoon structure protects and house the Museum's most valuable specimen collections. Designed by internationally renowned C F Møller Architects of Denmark, construction began in June 2006 and finished in September 2008.

Architectural highlights

- The 8-storey cocoon's surface is 3,500 square metres of hand-finished polished plaster, bound in steel channels resembling silk threads.
- The 30 steel columns are each 28m long.
- The west façade casts dramatic shadows on the cocoon throughout the day, highlighting its curved form.

References:
1. Natural History Museum nhm.ac.uk

Connected Companies

News: (1)

Avanti Architects have completed the design and management of the first phase of urgent repair work to the terracotta façade of the Natural History Museum.

The team coordinated a comprehensive physical and visual survey, with complex access requirements to identify the repairs required. Based upon on-site trials, a bespoke repair specification was developed for each complex terracotta block, which will be monitored going forward. These investigations and repair work, have enabled the museum to develop a programme to conserve the entire Grade I listed façade.

The specialist contractors were Taylor Pearce.

Via http://avantiarchitects.co.uk

02/10/2018 13:26 by Buildington

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