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Lynton House rear view

Lynton House rear view

30.04.2012
Lynton House in April 2012

Lynton House in April 2012

April 2012
View to Lynton House from Bishop's Bridge Road

View to Lynton House from Bishop's Bridge Road

April 2012

April 2012

4.3.2011
Angled rendered balconies on reverse elevation.

Angled rendered balconies on reverse elevation.

4.3.2010
Lynton House at Hallfield Estate

Lynton House at Hallfield Estate

4.3.2010

Lynton House

Address:
Hallfield Estate, London W2 6EW
Type:
Residential
Completion:
1958
Viewed:
27240

Description of Lynton House

Lynton House is an apartment building at Hallfield Estate in Bayswater, London W2.

The Hallfield Estate is a post-war housing estate, built on a 17 acre site which was originally laid out with brick and stucco terraces and villas, but was cleared following war damage.

The estate was built between 1951-59 by the architectural practice Drake and Lasdun and comprises fifteen blocks and a primary school. It was designed as a deliberate contrast to the architectural fabric of nineteenth century Bayswater and was intended as a radical model for the borough of Paddington's post-war re-housing programme.

The ten and six storey blocks are laid out on a grid at 45 degrees to the surrounding roads. They are set in an attractive landscape setting, which includes chestnut, sycamore, mountain ash and mulberry trees and also magnolias and catalpas.

The 6-storey houses are sixteen metres high and on an roughly north-south axis with the living room facade facing roughly east.

The block has one central lift while stairways at the south and northern ends are open and accessed from the west side of the block.

Front Elevations

The gable walls and columns on the access galleries are clad with precast panels. Between the columns the
perforated balustrade panels are of dark brick this is not as original and was altered c.1985. Detailing was originally as seen in Figure 9 in perforated concrete. The walls behind the access galleries and the east-elevation are faced with red Dunbricks.

Window openings are all steel, either three panel with casements to either side and a top hung light to the centre or single panel with top hung light (the latter design is positioned next to door openings).

The ground floor is set back, creating an overhang, with upper stories supported on columns.

Reverse Elevation

This elevation has very distinctive private balconies, but only to the third and fifth floors to prevent overshadowing. These balconies form one of the distinctive features of the estate - their angular form, with a cut-out for railings, is a playful feature of much the same spirit as the
screens to the ten storey buildings.

All window openings to the reverse elevation are coupled, three panel steel windows. All flats with balconies have floor-to-ceiling glazing consisting of a pair of French doors with window light and full length margin panel. Two transoms create fixed middle glazing section which runs across all three panels.

Transport
The nearest tube station is Bayswater on Queensway (5 minutes' walk. Paddington Station is 10 minutes' walk from here.

Source: Conservation Area Audit 2008, westminster.gov.uk

Connected Companies

Property Manager:

News: (3)

Major refurbishment plans for Hallfield Estate revealed as Westminster City Council grants planning permission for:

APPLICATION (A)
Replacement of existing single glazed steel windows and doors on 14 residential blocks and the estate office with aluminium framed, double glazed windows in a pattern to match the existing in the existing window openings on the 10 storey blocks and parts of the living room elevations on the six storey blocks and the estate office.

Installation of new painted timber street doors and double glazed fanlights in a pattern to match the existing, in the existing door openings and installation of new steel framed double glazed windows, in a pattern to match the existing, in the existing window openings on parts of the living room elevations of the six storey blocks and the estate office.

APPLICATION (B)
Repairs and alterations, including cleaning, concrete repairs, repointing and structural repairs to brickwork and copings; replacement and repair of asphalt as necessary on walkways, balconies and ninth floor terrace; repairs to and redecoration of metalwork; replacement or refurbishment of refuse hoppers, refixing of loose tiles and replacement of broken or cracked tiles with new to match existing; redecoration of common parts, roof plant area and estate office; installation of new metal balustrading to some of the six storey blocks at ground level and installation of new guardrails at roof level to the 10 storey blocks.

Source: Westminster City Council weekly planning list 25.03.2012. Decision date: 20.03.2012.

06/04/2012 13:29 by Buildington

Major refurbishment plans for Hallfield Estate revealed as Westminster City Council grants planning permission for:

APPLICATION (A)
Replacement of existing single glazed steel windows and doors on 14 residential blocks and the estate office with aluminium framed, double glazed windows in a pattern to match the existing in the existing window openings on the 10 storey blocks and parts of the living room elevations on the six storey blocks and the estate office.

Installation of new painted timber street doors and double glazed fanlights in a
pattern to match the existing, in the existing door openings and installation of new steel framed double glazed windows, in a pattern to match the existing, in the existing window openings on parts of the living room elevations of the six storey blocks and the estate office.

APPLICATION (B)
Repairs and alterations, including cleaning, concrete repairs, repointing and structural repairs to brickwork and copings; replacement and repair of asphalt as necessary on walkways, balconies and ninth floor terrace; repairs to and redecoration of metalwork; replacement or refurbishment of refuse hoppers, refixing of loose tiles and replacement of broken or cracked tiles with new to match existing; redecoration of common parts, roof plant area and estate office; installation of new metal balustrading to some of the six storey blocks at ground level and installation of new guardrails at roof level to the 10 storey blocks.

Source: Westminster City Council weekly planning list 25.03.2012. Decision date: 20.03.2012.

06/04/2012 13:28 by Buildington

Hallfield Estate, designed in the 1950s by Berthold Lubetkin, was one of the first postwar estates to adopt modernist principles. Designated a Conservation Area it is well loved and has been well cared for.

Over the years there have been inevitable changes, as well as the emergence of defects, some related to the construction method, some resulting from lack of maintenance.

John McAslan + Partners have prepared a feasibility report on repair options and are now preparing tender documents for extensive refurbishment.

The commission is sensitive, requiring JMP to meet resident requirements while safeguarding the special qualities of the design.

The distinctive façades contrast solid and void, light and shadow. The slim steel windows with varied fenestration patterns contribute to the overall facade design. Repair of the concrete as well as any
replacement of windows has to be carefully evaluated to ensure architectural quality is retained while technical demands and modern day requirements are addressed.

Source: Conservation & Regeneration April 2011 www.mcaslan.co.uk

08/08/2011 15:06 by Buildington

*DISCLAIMER! Information on this page is for guidance only and remains subject to change. Buildington does not sell or let this property. For more information about this property please register your interest on the original website or get in touch with the Connected Companies.

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